The piece consists of an environment to accommodate a collection of fruit flies, and a 12 mins video that represents the day and the night within the world of fruit flies. 

 The time we live within and without(2017)  Interactive installation with light, distance sensor, and fruit flies' habitat  12 mins video loop

The time we live within and without(2017)

Interactive installation with light, distance sensor, and fruit flies' habitat

12 mins video loop

The inside of the box is illuminated by a light sphere, which shuts off when the viewer approaches the box to view the fruit flies, through the incorporation of a distance sensor. This is designed to be a symbolic representation of an eclipse. In this artificial habitat, an eclipse, as the sublime and the wonder of nature, is triggered by arbitrary human intervention. The concept of the eclipse refers to the artist’s interest in impermanence and the difference in how the time span of “life” is perceived concerning different species, and specifically the dominance that mankind holds over the realm of how time is to be organized. The idea of ritual or structured time becomes referenced through the representation of an eclipse, on account of an eclipse being something that can only be experienced at most, several times within a lifetime. It begs the question of how life for different organisms is experienced, and specifically focuses on what is actually considered to be human. 

The common fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, is known as the most widely used “model organisms” (which is also a prototype) for modern bio-science, due to its short life cycle, rapid reproduction, and its 60% genetic similarity to humans. The chosen of this organism aims at emphasizing the ambiguity of the relationship between what is real and what is artificial in correlation to how different species experience life, and the dominance that human perception maintains in the realm of evolution and biology.